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of problems. we look at the foreign policy agenda when the all-stars join me after the break. i'm phil mic. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, haveuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. [ phil ] get back to the things that matter most. ask your rhe
on foreign policy. let's take a listen to what he did have to say. >> we will uphold our values through strength of arm and rule of law. we will show the courage to try to resolve our issues peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face but because engagement can lift suspicion and fear. america will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe, and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage a crisis abroad, and no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world. >> we are joined by the director of the center at the atlantic council. thanks for being with us. we just heard the entire context of the mention of foreign policy. are you surprised how little was mentioned? >> not at all. this is the essence of foreign policy where we need to focus on domestic renewal. there were some bold initiatives in terms of rhetoric in the first year of the administration. we heard the cairo speech talking to the muslim world. we heard the prague speech, but the follow-up was a little bit tepid, so i think you will see more of the same, very fe
surprising and perhaps not surprising many the speech in the last block, but i thought this foreign policy piece was one of the more surprising things he mentioned. insofar as it sounded like obama 1.0, the obama that was elected in 2008, who has since expanded the use of drones and extra judicial killings, who has had a very aggressive national security policy in place. i wondered what that meant, especially against the back drop of what is happening in the middle east, in syria, and algeria, and mali. what was your read on it? >> but has also, to be fair to president obama, ended the iraq war and begun the drive out of the afghanistan war. one of the really interesting things about the second term, we talked in the first segment about all of the issues of medicare and social security. anything there has to go through a republican house. >> right. >> creating obama's foreign policy does not, for the most part, and we can argue about congressional authority, but presidents have wide latitude on foreign policy, and his appointments on the foreign policy side in chuck hagel and to some lesse
there will be a lot of focus domestic issues. what about foreign policy? >> history shows us that presidents in their second term focus more on foreign policy than the first term and try to forge a legacy. bill clinton did that in his second term. barack obama will try to focus more on the middle east, maybe more on syria. the most pressing issues are domestic. his voters expect him to act on that. he will attack in the first two years. history also tells us after the midterm election of a second term president start to fade away into sort of a lame duck status. >> interesting analysis there. thank you very much, max. in more international news suicide bombers and gunmen attacked afghanistan's travel police leaving three officers dead and more than three wounded. rather assault began at dawn at the entrance to the complex, the second coordinated raid in as many weeks. taliban claim responsibility. it is feared there could be more of these attacks in the months ahead as international forces prepare to withdraw. voter it is are ready to say goodbye to the chancellor's conservative government.
. it has played a role in moving people to see some of the backroom dealings of u.s. foreign policy. it has exposed people to think harder. i do think it played a role in leading people in tunisia and egypt to look at some of the cables and see what people already knew in their gut the soccer field in wikileaks about the alliances between u.s. foreign policy with the most repressive elements in those countries. let's hope that changes as the uprisings continue. anytime you can learn more about what is being done in our name, it is critical. that is part of what transparency is about. the freedom of information act is still not working well under the obama administration. some of that is pos/t 9/11. in los war will lead to a decline in information transparency access. anytime you can have less sequence -- secrecy, that is good. less secrecy is needed. it was handled at the outset by partnering with newspapers like "the guardian," traditional newspapers of distinction. wikileaks released documents around the world to newspapers in india, haiti, the middle east, latin america. it has had an im
and president obama's second foreign policy. plus the bush years could have been known the world according to dick cheney. brit brit explains it all. he's next right here in the war room. [ male announcer ] the exclusive air suspension in the 2013 ram 1500. ♪ ♪ engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ ♪ guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet but they're gonna fall in love get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for
tonight. the fight against al qaeda and militant islam in africa. one of the many foreign policy challenges for the commander and chief's second term. the state department today confirmed that last week's hostage standoff at a gas plant in algeria did kill three americans: according to the prime minister. two canadians and team of explosive experts who had planned to blow up the place. the prime minister also said the military operation to free those hostage resulted in the deaths of dozens of prisoners. you will recall last week the militants stormed the facility near the lib i can't be border. according to the al gearian they claim it was pay back for algeria letting french jets use airspace to attack infamous fighters in neighboring mali. jonathan hunt has this in new york tonight. jonathan, last week we had a lot of criticism of the algerians. there seems to be a change in tone now. >> yeah, very much so. last week the british and japanese governments in particular were very critical of what they saw as an overly aggressive and heavy handed response by the algerian security
on the notion he was going to transform the way the u.s. conducted its foreign policy around the world. he then proceeded to double down on some of the greatest successes of the bush administration. if you look at the use of the state secrets privilege or the with the obama administration expanded the drone wars, powered special operations forces from jsoc to join special operations command to operate in countries where the united states is not at war, if you look at the way the obama administration essentially boxed congress out of any effective oversight role of the covert aspect of u.s. foreign policy, what we really have is a president who has normalized for many, net -- many liberals, the policies they once opposed under the bush and ministration. this has been a war presidency. yesterday as president obama talked about how we don't need a state of perpetual war, multiple u.s. drone strikes in yemen, a country we are not at war with, where the u.s. has killed a tremendous number of civilians. to make, most disturbing about this is john brennan, who really was the architect of this dro
to say, i am going to for bridget to focus on foreign policy rather than domestic policy. all of that has to come with regards to the dialogue that goes on between any president and the people who put him in office. tavis: this inauguration is special because the president has been inaugurated for a second time on this historic king holiday. this is also the first time any president has been inaugurated while, the steps near where he is inaugurated, is a monument to dr. martin luther king jr. you were with the president when the monument was unveiled. offer some reflections on what that experience was like. >> obviously, that was a tremendous experience last year. that monument, i spent some much of my life, the last 10 years, helping to design it. i tell the whole story about how we wanted to be a monument not just to king, but to the tremendous freedom struggle. to be there and watch president obama, i was interested in what he would have to say. no one would question that obama, from a very early age, through his mother, understood king's importance and the importance of the movement.
and their second terms end up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats 234 congress than any other time in the 20th scentry except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election ne next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures rel
't be any more. kicked off the state's last night after bashing the president's foreign policy. here is just a bit of what happened. ♪ lou: i thought that was a rather -- went on for more than 30 minutes. thirty minutes. what he said or how long he took to say it. lupe fiasco has made headlines before. not two years ago he called the present the biggest terrorist. is sort of makes you wonder why he was invited to begin with. i thought it was kind of a catchy tune. up next in a gas prices and the national debt of nearly doubled. more than 20 million people remain out of work. what story? the "a-team" rejoins us or, if you will, an analysis of this administration first and second term prospects. monica crowley, michael goodwin, judith miller are back. stay with us. ♪ lou: well, i hate to break up the inaugural party with the fact that we realized that a number of americans have died along with a nuber of others in that hostage siege in algeria. we are back. monica crowley is here, as is judith miller and michael goodwin. i want to start with you. this is another raw, open wound on this adm
seconds i want to close it out with you. it seems at times the president left foreign policy to secretary of state hillary clinton. george, do you see him play an extended role in foreign policy or will he late john kerry take the lead. >> i think he will. his speech focused on making sure friends of old enemies. he's focusing on democrac diplomacy. that's something that obama will have to get involved with at that level. i think he will get involved. >> john: one more time, alex, does john kerry have a charisma deficit that the president needs to worry about. >> john kerry has never been known for charisma, but he has been on the stage for a long time and he can hold his own. >> that's why the two of you are always the smartest kids in class. thank you so much for coming on, on this inauguration day. >> thank you. >> john: what would martin luther king jr. be doing if he were alive today? chances are he wouldn't be working for the koch brothers. coming up next. only on current tv. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just becaus
up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats in congress than any other time in the 20th century except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures related to gun violence. becau
once, he barely mentions economic growth or the private sector. think about foreign policy. he doesn't mention terrorism, jihaddism. a decade of war is ending. has anyone told the jihadists in algeria or the taliban in afghanistan? he didn't mention afghanistan, he didn't mention iran. how many times in his first term did president obama try to establish his bona fides as a tough guy by saying he would not let iran get nuclear weapons? not a word about it and, indeed, almost the opposite, that engage empty's the way -- engagement's the way to handle problem abroad. jon: we are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. >> it really struck me. two things about it. first of all, we would not have won the peace of after world war ii if we hadn't win the wore. he got out of iraq, he's getting us out of afghanistan or, he seems not to want to confront jihadists or the iranian regime, so the idea you can win a peace without winning the war is delusional. but also that sentence, in particular he says they didn't just win the wa
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
. and i think that's really what he wants to do with the foreign policy is to move it in a new direction. >> it means he's going back to cairo. the speech he gave in june, 200 9d, he's going back to cairo. >> let's talk about that. let me talk about this. i think what i'm hearing from robin right, some real experts in the middle east. we may not be able to, but if we can, and they do proceed on it and once we attack them, we will never be able to talk them out of it. they will go back and do it again and again and again. if we go to war with them, it will be an unending struggle. we have a little time to talk them out of it. and i think that's what he's trying to send, this big message. to say you know what, i don't think cheney wanted peace. i think he wanted a war. but maybe this guy will give us something? that puts us in a position where we can say yes, we're not going to go nuclear. we're not going to do it. that's what they want. they want trade. they want economic opportunity. maybe they want to join the world. >> and the thing is, he's backed up these words by picking chuck hagel
that was a signal to the iranians, listen, if you come halfway with me, we can cut a deal. that's the foreign policy stuff and a lot of people, netanyahu is going to win that election tomorrow i bet they're looking hard at that tonight. >> greta: the thing i pick out and always the thing i pick out and sampled, is that he talks about helping the streets of detroit, and economically. and i thought to myself, well, you know, poverty in this country has grown over the last decade, including, including in his administration, is that the people in this country, the poor people still are left behind and we sort of always pay sort of political lip service and say how much we want to help them. as the improverished class grows, we aren't helped them and given them opportunity to help themselves. >> i was talking to dennis kucinich in the green room. what happened to detroit, it was a forge and furnace of world war ii, 2 million people there, it was freedom's forge or arthur herman's new book, my wife grew up there. and now it's 750, 800,000 people. and thinking of tearing down buildings and turning it into
going to ackle foreign policy. (sot mcdonough)4 44he talked about hope and change, and peopll had belief in what he would do, buu now we havv a record. he talked the talk, but doesn't walk the walk.(sot pal)15 25the key hhre issnnt to rehash what happened four years ago or the election that jjst passed. or the thingg that the president did or did not do . why can't we findd common ground sittdoon and when is it goinggto happenn you have to talk to the &pppesiient about thht. not the answer i was looking for.not the answer he was looking for either..nd now he nntion watches to see if the president who inspired so much fact, turn hope, into .can inn ccange.... ... ii his second onn polllter says that like his first.... and more like theesecond inauuuration of george w. bush. bush.innfact,... the... 50 percent... who matches ... the percentage of ameeicans... excitedd../// just... before... presidenn ábush'sá second term. 3 the response this ommn gave hee overrin a scooter....in 10 minutes on ffx45 news at ten and i'' paul gessler at the i'll tll you what to expect . high- prof
to foreign policy and national security thing was his comment on the fact that we don't have to live with perpetual warfare for lives in decades. that could turn out to be one of the most important parts of the speech. we have national security and the defense budget, which i think is wildly out of control. it is a kind of old war budget for a very different era. and i hope that the president and the administration and republicans as well as democrats will take a good look at that. neil: did he miss an opportunity to do so? i know all about broad visions any spell out some of the details, but this was an opportunity to say that i see the magnitude of our debt. i see the magnitude of our problems. i am not oblivious to this. i want us all to join hands and look at ways to mutually get this down to size without dividing our social classes. i don't know if that opportunity was seized on appropriately enough today. >> well, i think it was a different kind of speech. but this is a president who has cut spending. he wants to cut more. i wish i could see that desire on a partisan basis, esp
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
think there was a pretty strong sense today that not just on domestic policy, but even on some foreign policy, he moved. sometimes the criticism was he kept a little too much of bush, this was a breaking point. a lot of what lingered, some of the people, some of the policies seem to be pushed back now. >> was this the speech that liberals have been waiting for? >> sure it was. >> and now is it the foundation for the next several years? >> well, barack obama is a complicated man. we have to be honest about him. >> he is a deal maker. >> yeah, he is. and he is also a mediator. he really does believe in trying to bring people together. so we can't tell ourselves that he is going to give us everything we want. but what i thought from this speech was that he was saying, look, i know where you're at, the people who elected me. i know the coalition that elected me. if you keep the noise up, if you keep talking about this, i'll take care of you. i will watch for you. and he wasn't tossing them all under the bus. this was not a hey, i know you elected me, but now i can't do much for you. >> was
second term, foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like president obama and one of the many reasons i like him because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran. richard angel is nbc's chief correspondent and steve clemons is the editor-at
another must be equal as well. >> reporter: foreign policy absent from his address, though he heralded the end of a decade of war, and touted the economy. >> the commitments we may teach each other, these things do not sap our nation, they strengthen us. >> reporter: the president mostly refrained from partisan jabs but appeared to single out his former gop opponent mitt romney with this line. >> they do not make us a nation of takers. ♪ >> reporter: filling the air with patriotism, the voices of kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ >> reporter: there was a poem and prayers. as he left the front of the capitol, a nostalgic president turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: before the president gets back to work, he heads to the washington national cathedral for an interfaith service for prayers to be offered up for the country and the president. it's a tradition that dates back to fdr. soledad. >> dan lothian, thank you. for the night and parties at night, really party mode in the nation's capital, while
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
in algeria that this is basically how the u.s. is going to conduct foreign policy when it comes to that issue in the world, this idea of leading from behind? >> i think that that is -- has certainly been the tenor recently and it looks like it will continue to be. let's lead from behind. let's provide support where we can. but let's not just get actively involved and in it up to our wastes. >> okay. we'll leave it there. we appreciate your time from houston this morning. >>> now, over to japan. a speed change in mon tar policy under way and a share role on tokyo and equation. >> foifrt fist time, the bank of japan a suggesting'ing a 2% pure chasing. from the jot set, today's decision was an exercise, so to speak, in showing that the central bank and the government are on the same page when it comes to trying reflat the japanese economy. here is what the governor had to say. >> the government has again pledged to take concrete steps towards the sustainable fiscal struck structure. we have high expectations for the government's measures. >> but here comes the tricky part. the bank of japan is a
far into foreign policy that it's inevitable that we're going to find places where we have funded people who are actually against us. as you know, i'm for less foreign involvement. >> another question from the web. the president talked about climate change. not something obviously that we've heard a lot about in the debates you've been discussing for the past hour or so. your thoughts on where this might go in this 113th congress. >> my instinct is what you heard in the president's inauguration speech, he was trying to basically throw a bone to every left wing activist group he could. and so start to think about this more from this white house. they've received so much pressure from labor and from those of us who, you know, want the economy to grow on things like the keystone pipeline. >> i think it's a company that wants money like solyndra. >> but you start to see the game being played. this goes back to my earlier discussion if you actually just read the speech and wrote side notes on it saying, oh this is for this constituency, this is to make this group money, oh, but if i do
francisco and ewald respectively. [speaking foreign language] >> the role of the parent advisory council, pac, is to represent parent voices and perspectives to inform education policy discussions. and this report highlights our project activities for january. to engage families in two important initiatives. history and practices and the plan. [speaking foreign language] >> the pac welcomes new commissioner matthew haney and congratulates sandra fewer, and rachel norton, and jill wynns on their re-election to the board of education. we look forward to working with you all. i am going to talk a little bit about restorative practices. the pac continues to receive requests to conduct community conversations regarding restorative practices from both school staff and our community partners. this morning the pac's restorative practices team will lead to many conversations. the first one will be with parent leaders from mission (inaudible) who are primarily spanish speaking and representatives in the school district. the second conversations will be with parent representatives from the second d
environmental extremism in the past and they will again. the conservative argument being these policies cost jobs, they make the u.s. less competitive against foreign markets. but you've got to wonder how big a fight, myra, are the republicans willing to get into on this? >> i thought it was a pretty aggressive speech from the president yesterday. his underlying premise in the speech was the economy's pretty much taken care of, i can move on to other issues like immigration, climate change and marriage. to his base, he's saying it's taken me four years to fix the economy. now i'm going to move on to some of your priorities. >> well, if that's what he's saying, is that how you heard it, margie? >> maybe i was watching a different channel. i saw a president who talked very specifically about openness and diversity and those are things that really we all share and it's certainly a lesson from this election and when you're talking specifically about climate change, a majority of americans say that they feel, this is according to gallup and pew, it's happening now, it's something that scientists
relatively benign. interest rate policy benign. as long as foreign exchange volatility remains rather muted, becky, risk asset, both housing and equity should continue to do well. we expect s&ps probably to get above 1500 by the end of march, beginning part of april. >> i'm sure people everywhere are going to be irritated with you this morning, john. let's talk about some of the things that we heard from these companies who have reported today. we spoke with ellen kullman the ceo of dupont a little earlier. we talked about how things like construction are expected to be very strong in the first half of the year. but things like automobiles, maybe not as strong as they were at the end of 2012. is that things that the stock market knows at this point or is this things that could actually move some of those other indices? she also talked about something something being very strong and maybe that helps somebody like a john deere. >> those are two different stories. fnks financing rates and borrowing rates remind very, very kind and a turnover within the domestic stock of automobiles should cont
, congress and the administration should be implementing policies that encourage job creation, rein in government regulations, replace our convoluted tax code with one that is fair, simple and certain, open foreign markets to american manufactured goods and agricultural products and develop a comprehensive energy policy. we are not immune from the laws of economics that face every nation. the congressional budget office estimates that government spending on health care entitlements, soegts security and -- social security and interest on the national debt will consume 100% of the total revenues generated by the federal government by the year 2025. that means the money that the government spends on national defense, transportation, veterans health care and other government programs will have to be borrowed, driving us even further into debt. c.b.o. issued a report last june which warned that unless we work to reduce our debt, we face the increased probability of a sudden fiscal crisis that would cause investors to lose confidence in the government's ability to manage its budget and th
that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our country's reckless policies. this is robbing our cities and states of critical investments and infrastructure like bridges, ports and levees. every dollar we pay in interest is a dollar that is not going to investment in america's priorities. instead, interest payments are a significant tax on all americans, a debt tax, that washington doesn't want to talk about. increasing america's debt weakens domestically and internationally. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden on bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren. america has a debt problem. and a failure of leadership. americans deserve better. all of those words were taken from then senator obama's statement before he voted against raising the debt ceiling in 2006. truer words cannot have been spoken today. the debt burden the president was concerned about a few years ago is still a very real threat today. congress should pass a responsible budget so we have a road map t
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)